2. November 14, 2011

Sound in the Field and in iMovie '11


Opening Items

  • Pages Templates
    • Making another page
    • Exporting as PDF
    • See it done (also on Pre-production page, under Storyboards and Shot Lists)
  • Project #1
  • Edmodo questions?
    • Label your posts (e.g. "Project #1, Kathy Shirley") so they can be searched for
    • Post PDFs, not original documents
  • EYMF: (last year's site, but most should be the same)
  • Newbies: stick around after dismissal for a very brief moment


Film Featurette:

  • Cabaret
    • 8 Academy Awards (Director, Actress, Cinematography, Score, Supporting Actor, Editing, Art Direction, Sound)
    • Most Academy Awards by a non-Best Picture winner [lost out to the Godfather]
    • Current 97% "Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes 
    • #5 Best Musical—American Film Institute (behind Sound of Music and West Side Story? Are you kidding me?)
  • Using an External Microphone (also on the Production page, under Sound)
  • 10 minute YouTube clip with fascinating BTS footage from Pixar, Disney, Star Wars. Interestingly, much of the interviews are out of sync.
  • 8 minute YouTube clip of BTS sound design on LOTR. Some great before/after stuff. Helps you realize that on many films none of the sound that was filmed on set makes it into the finished movie.


Learning

Kinds of sounds in iMovie '11
  1. Video soundtrack
    1. Preferences
      1. General > Show Advanced Tools
      2. Browser > Show Fine Tuning Controls
      3. Browser > Always show clip durations
    2. Traditional Timeline View (totally optional)
      1. Swap Events and Projects 
      2. Close Effects window (if open; more room)
      3. Enable Waveforms 
      4. Enable single row view (traditional timeline) 
      5. Adjust Number of Frames Slider to taste 
    3. Video soundtrack 
      1. Drag Levels Bar to raise/lower volume
      2. Drag a selection to duck audio
      3. Double-click on video clip to open Inspector, click on Audio tab
        1. Volume
        2. Auto-ducking
        3. Fades
        4. Enhance (reduce noise)
        5. Equalizer
        6. Normalize
      4. Click on Clip tab, Audio Effects
    4. To separate from video, Control- or Right-click and choose Detach Audio
    5. Can't copy/paste portions (I don't think)
    6. Can't delete video
    7. You can add Audio Only to a project from Event Browser
      1. Select the part you want in one of your Events
      2. Drag onto any clip in your Project Browser
      3. Select Audio only from menu
      4. Move the audio anywhere, just like a sound effect
  2. Background music (green)
    1. Automatically fades out at end of video
    2. Goes from start to end (of either the song or video)
    3. To pin to another location: grab title and drag (turns purple)
    4. Can't copy/paste portions (I don't think)
  3. Sound Effects (purple)
    1. Can be any sound
    2. Drag to desired location
    3. Use Left and Right Arrow keys for fine tuning
    4. Can copy/paste portions
    5. Sound effects can be stacked; no limit

Task

In this exercise, you are going to shoot the same thing 4 times, each with a different mic setup. Each of the 4 shots should look as visually similar as possible. Each shot should include a label identifying the mic setup. Extras: if you have time add background music, duck the audio, and include a sound effect.

Please re-assemble by 5:15.
 Colin    
(A-F)
 Brad
(G-L)
 Shannon
(M-R)
 Tom
(S-Z)
 Randy     Cindy Olivia Dana
 Molly Samantha Kellie Crystal
    


Plan it Out
  1. Pick an actor to be the guinea pig
  2. Agree upon a single phrase to be shot 4 times. If you don't want to think, use the phrase, "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog". But you can do better, I know you can.
Shoot the Scene
  1. Shot 1: Camera audio from about 3 feet away from speaker. Try to frame the video so it's a comfortable head and shoulders shot. Leave little if any headroom.
  2. Shot 2: Camera audio from about 10 feet away from speaker. Try to frame the video so it's visually as close to the first shot as possible. Use the zoom to make up for the distance.
  3. Shot 3: Wireless Lav mic audio from about 10 feet away from speaker. Try to frame the video so it's visually as close to the first shot as possible. Use the zoom to make up for the distance.
  4. Shot 4: Boom/shotgun mic from about 10 feet away from speaker. Try to frame the video so it's visually as close to the first shot as possible. Use the zoom to make up for the distance.
Publish your Work
  1. Import footage into iMovie.
  2. Arrange the 4 shots in order on a timeline.
  3. Label each shot: "Camera audio/ 3 feet", "Camera audio/ 10 feet", etc.
  4. Listen to it all to see if you can hear differences. Use good headphones, if available. The differences will be more pronounced.
  5. If you have time, add music and sound effects, just for the practice.
  6. Export a copy: Share > Export Movie > Medium.
  7. Deliver your exported movie to the presentation computer.

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